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Growing up as a young Muslim girl in Toronto, Chaudhry said she struggled with K. 4:34. “It appeared to say that husbands could hit their wives if they were disobedient.”

“Later, when I learned of Muslim scholars who interpreted this verse in ways that do not condone violence or inequality, I was puzzled as to why these interpretations were considered by some to be outside the Islamic tradition.”

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You can’t create and foster strong families with this kind of anti-women attitude.

Muslim women fight for their honor on all fronts. Against anti-Muslim bigots who strip her of agency, secular feminists who demean her choices, and Muslims themselves who marginalize, abuse, and mock her. The past few days we hit a new low, when a prominent UK scholar attached to the Islamic education institute Al Maghrib issued a series of tweets and Facebook posts ridiculing International Women’s Day.

Update March 11: A great article from The Islamic Monthly:

We have a real problem of sexism and misogyny within and outside our communities – social media chants can be cathartic (and I do love them) and yes we have a right to be angry, but we have an even greater responsibility to be productive in finding the solutions to our ailments.

And to our Shayukh – especially those who have lessened the seriousness of the impact of Shaykh Niamatullah’s ‘jokes’: you have a responsibility to promote that which is good and forbid that which is evil. When you have a segment of your community, of this Ummah, which is constantly under a barrage of hatred and suspicion, constantly have their bodies used as cultural warfare fronts – those jokes that you may see as misunderstood playful banter become daggers in the back.

In the face of such obstinate and reckless hate, I think about some words from Habib Ali about responding to the call of Women in our community:

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"Man is certainly free, but he is responsible for this freedom before God as before men. This responsibility is inevitably moral. In order of this morality, to be free is to protect the freedom of others and their dignities"

Tariq RamadanIslam, the West and the Challenges of Modernity (via tariqramadan)

(Source: lespritmodestee, via tariqramadan)

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Sad on so many levels. The most emotional part of the story behind this picture is near the end:
“Interestingly the church opposite the Mosque had a sign that said something like “Jesus welcomes all” - or something to that effect.To be honest, the mosque issue is just a symptom of a much greater problem. If “they” don’t want women in the mosque, imagine how “they” view the women in their lives. What to say about these women… their ambitions, inspirations, hopes and dreams? What sort of children would these women bring up? What sort of society are we producing when we shut the masjid to these women and yet every other door is open to them” 
sideentrance:

"No sisters in this masjid. Please wait until further notice." Sign at a mosque in the UK.
Photo submitted by Dr. Bilal Hassam, who writes,”To note: There was some construction happening, but that’s by the by, there are plenty of masjids which simply do not allow women in, period. I know many in Leicester, purpose built majestic masjids with no access for women. This was from a N.London masjid, I was travelling and needed somewhere to pray. Found this place on Google Maps. This (tattered) poster was on the front door - clearly had been there a while. The mosque was of a medium size and was locked! I was going to pray outside when the caretaker reluctantly let me in. I wonder what would have happened if I was with a sister/wife/mother… Empty mosque, would they have let a sister in, I didn’t get the feeling they would.Interestingly the church opposite the Mosque had a sign that said something like “Jesus welcomes all” - or something to that effect.To be honest, the mosque issue is just a symptom of a much greater problem. If “they” don’t want women in the mosque, imagine how “they” view the women in their lives. What to say about these women… their ambitions, inspirations, hopes and dreams? What sort of children would these women bring up? What sort of society are we producing when we shut the Masjid to these women and yet every other door is open to them? If our mothers are prevented from accessing the House of God, what sort of children will they be bringing up to lead us? We need doubly efforts to engage and nurture our sisters. We have a lot of work to do. Allah help us.”

Sad on so many levels. The most emotional part of the story behind this picture is near the end:

Interestingly the church opposite the Mosque had a sign that said something like “Jesus welcomes all” - or something to that effect.

To be honest, the mosque issue is just a symptom of a much greater problem. If “they” don’t want women in the mosque, imagine how “they” view the women in their lives. What to say about these women… their ambitions, inspirations, hopes and dreams? What sort of children would these women bring up? What sort of society are we producing when we shut the masjid to these women and yet every other door is open to them”

sideentrance:

"No sisters in this masjid. Please wait until further notice." Sign at a mosque in the UK.

Photo submitted by Dr. Bilal Hassam, who writes,”To note: There was some construction happening, but that’s by the by, there are plenty of masjids which simply do not allow women in, period. I know many in Leicester, purpose built majestic masjids with no access for women.

This was from a N.London masjid, I was travelling and needed somewhere to pray. Found this place on Google Maps. This (tattered) poster was on the front door - clearly had been there a while. The mosque was of a medium size and was locked! I was going to pray outside when the caretaker reluctantly let me in. I wonder what would have happened if I was with a sister/wife/mother… Empty mosque, would they have let a sister in, I didn’t get the feeling they would.

Interestingly the church opposite the Mosque had a sign that said something like “Jesus welcomes all” - or something to that effect.

To be honest, the mosque issue is just a symptom of a much greater problem. If “they” don’t want women in the mosque, imagine how “they” view the women in their lives. What to say about these women… their ambitions, inspirations, hopes and dreams? What sort of children would these women bring up? What sort of society are we producing when we shut the Masjid to these women and yet every other door is open to them?

If our mothers are prevented from accessing the House of God, what sort of children will they be bringing up to lead us? We need doubly efforts to engage and nurture our sisters. We have a lot of work to do. Allah help us.”

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A post from eaglebeaver who shares a personal story about how people carelessly and hypocritically blur the lines between culture and religion when talking about Islam and Muslims:

Here’s the scene - it’s a master’s of social work class and the professor is explaining her PowerPoint lesson. She started giving examples of what social justice issues are when she moved forward to this slide. I was tired, but listening, until I read ‘women in the Middle East’ on the list. I immediately asked the professor how Middle Eastern women are considered a social justice issue. She turned the question to the class. To my dismay, some classmates had ready answers. People were saying stuff like “because they’re oppressed by their leaders and the men of their country” and “they don’t have any control over their bodies” and some people were nodding their heads in agreement. My hand shot up, and I explained the difference between culture and religion, with the added twist of region and wealth. Not all aspects of culture are monotone; there are so many degrees in variations of differences and to make such a blanket statement was very unfair. It was when another student tried to justify the professor’s statement by talking about how “all Muslim women are forced to cover, which leaves them not in control over their own bodies” that I briefly stated that a vast majority of women that cover do so of their own choosing. I then brought up Govener Rick Perry. I mentioned how he has passed laws directly restricting Texas women from making various choices in governing her body. I asked her that as a female actively living in Texas at this very moment, did she have full control over her body? There was a few moments of silence before the professor looks over the class and says “I don’t know about you guys, but I live in America and I’m a strong, independent woman who has 100% control over my own body!” The professor then turned to me and told me that it was a list of social justice suggestions, then briskly moved on to the next topic.
It’s kind of funny that cultural competency is a social work pillar, cause none of that was very culturally competent of her. This is not the first time I’ve had to feel like I had to defend Islam or Middle Eastern culture and people in this class. Seriously, wth.

A post from eaglebeaver who shares a personal story about how people carelessly and hypocritically blur the lines between culture and religion when talking about Islam and Muslims:

Here’s the scene - it’s a master’s of social work class and the professor is explaining her PowerPoint lesson. She started giving examples of what social justice issues are when she moved forward to this slide. I was tired, but listening, until I read ‘women in the Middle East’ on the list. I immediately asked the professor how Middle Eastern women are considered a social justice issue. She turned the question to the class. To my dismay, some classmates had ready answers. People were saying stuff like “because they’re oppressed by their leaders and the men of their country” and “they don’t have any control over their bodies” and some people were nodding their heads in agreement. My hand shot up, and I explained the difference between culture and religion, with the added twist of region and wealth. Not all aspects of culture are monotone; there are so many degrees in variations of differences and to make such a blanket statement was very unfair. It was when another student tried to justify the professor’s statement by talking about how “all Muslim women are forced to cover, which leaves them not in control over their own bodies” that I briefly stated that a vast majority of women that cover do so of their own choosing. I then brought up Govener Rick Perry. I mentioned how he has passed laws directly restricting Texas women from making various choices in governing her body. I asked her that as a female actively living in Texas at this very moment, did she have full control over her body? There was a few moments of silence before the professor looks over the class and says “I don’t know about you guys, but I live in America and I’m a strong, independent woman who has 100% control over my own body!” The professor then turned to me and told me that it was a list of social justice suggestions, then briskly moved on to the next topic.

It’s kind of funny that cultural competency is a social work pillar, cause none of that was very culturally competent of her. This is not the first time I’ve had to feel like I had to defend Islam or Middle Eastern culture and people in this class. Seriously, wth.

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"Take a boy like my son, who was 12 years old. He was born between two intifadas. What does he know but tanks and soldiers and jet fighters? He only meets Israelis who are soldiers. He thinks all Israelis are soldiers. This does not help us. Seeing each other as human beings helps us."

Ismail Khatib, whose 12 year old son was accidentally killed by Israeli soldiers.

From “Six inspiring stories of Jews saving Muslims and Muslims saving Jews”

(Source: judaism-islam.com)

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Wow.

YQ: “Well I guess 20 years ago when I was a teenager I definitely would have self identified as a Salafi Muslim but over the course of the last decade or so I’ve kind of sort of grown out of the movement now.

Interviewer: “What does that mean, ‘grown out of the movement’?”

YQ: “I found the movement is not as intellectual stimulating as I would like it to be….

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"No one must ever let power or social, economic, or political interest turn him or her away from other human beings, from the attention they deserve and the respect they are entitled to. nothing must ever lead to a person to compromise this principle or faith in favour of a political strategy aimed at saving or protecting a community from some peril. The freely offered, sincere heart of a poor, powerless individual is worth a thousand times more in the sight of God than the assiduously courted, self-interested heart of a rich one."

— Tariq Ramadan (via arzitekt)

(via tariqramadan)

Tags: islam muslims
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Their message: Islam is compatible with an anti-big government or libertararian philosophy. They do not denounce sharia, but defend it within a libertarian framework.

"Our approach is different," says Coley. "We use principles within sharia like maqasid (primary goals) to show their connection with John Locke’s principles of life, liberty and property."